CEG, London CEG, London CEG, London
CEG, London CEG, London

Gallery - Retrospective 3, 2014-2016

28 Walnut Street

Dallas Coughlan

28 Walnut Street

This piece represents my childhood home in a neighbourhood that no longer exists, due to the extension of Dundas Street and Riverside Drive. It was a working class and immigrant area. The houses were referred to as the country the inhabitants came from. The Dutch house, the Italian house, the German house, the Irish house, etc. If you were second, third or fourth generation as in my case you were called by your surname. I lived in Hudson house.

Collage on a painted and stamped canvas, photo transfer recycled and found objects including, maps and a serviette.


Connecting the Orbits

Kathleen Douglass

Connecting the Orbits

The course in pulled embroidery was led by Ethel Harper. Pulled embroidery changes a loosely woven piece of fabric into a beautiful piece of delicate embroidery work. In pulled work the threads of the fabric are compressed by pulling the stiches tightly, forming patterns of holes. By using various types of stitches a beautiful lace like pattern appears. The stitches used in this project were, ringed back basket filling, honeycomb, star eyelet, stain and Murver.


Francine

Kathie Morgan

Francine

Francine is the product of a Fabric Collage Class with Susan Carlson. This is my own drawing but I used online photos to guide the shading. Essentially the work is a colour value exercise. Many small pieces of fabric are cut and glue tacked down. Except for the eyes she is covered in co-ordinating tulle which is machine stitched down to hold all the small pieces in place.


Hexagon Hollyhocks.

Eleanor Noon

Hexagon Hollyhocks.

While teaching the Hexagon class, I challenged myself to hand piece the hexagons. The sky is machine pieced and quilted.


Maria Myers

This piece was done in a shibori dyeing class taught by Meg Cheesman. Using elastics, the marbles were attached to the material and then dyed using various colours. The circles resulted and I let them inspire me to stitch.


Back to Basics

Wilma Kirmse

Back to Basics

This project was created in my first class at CEG taught by Lynda Watson - Wire Winding. She encouraged us to "experiment" so I had played around with a variety of colours and decided it was time to try a piece with no colour, but diversity of materials instead. Thus Back to Basics became an all white piece using everything from crochet cotton to yarn to strips of organza. It seemed fitting to put it on black, and then I decided to embellish. I was new to embellishing with beads etc., so just let it happen, and this was the result.


Jan Van Fleet

This is one of three pieces that I made while taking "Working in a Series" led by Lynda Watson in 2015-16. I have not named any of the pieces in this series (but some rather amusing titles have been suggested by others). I started by selecting several pieces/scraps of fabric from my "stash" that I thought were complementary. These included fabrics of varying textures. I used these scraps, in various ways, for all three pieces in the series.

Working on one piece at a time, this is the way I created the background: I stitched two or three strips of fabric together using the sewing machine. I then cut that assemblage at odd angles, ending up with four or five pieced strips. Some or all of the pieced strips were then sewn together (by machine), resulting in a background that was about 50% larger than the intended finished size.

I embellished the background piece with stitches and beads. From time to time, I used a paper template with a 6" x 8" opening to "audition" views of what might become the finished piece. When I found a view I liked, I pinned the paper template in place, then moved on to the next piece in the series. Once I was satisfied with all three pieces, I made some final small adjustments—added stitches or other embellishments—and then prepared the three pieces for framing.


Needle Lace Pins

Rose Klein

Needle Lace Pins

The background on both is felted wool from recycled sweaters. Twenty gauge copper wire frames were covered with blanket stitch. The yellow pin is a spiderweb design with clear beads as dew drops. The brown pin is a free form design using gold threads.


Roses

Kay Sweetman

Roses

Growing up in Windsor, the Rose City, roses have always been important to me. My mother and grandmother had roses in their gardens and as a young child, I could always smell them. This piece was inspired by a picture my son took in his neighbours garden.

During Summer Workshop, Elaine Quehl taught us how to simplify our photos and then construct a flower using fabric and "Steam-a-Seam". Now I prefer my roses in fabric.


Patricia McCabe

This introduction to stitching was offered by Alix Jordan: the piece of pre-printed fabric was in my stash. I put the two together to practice the stitches I was learning. The limited colour scheme was chosen to help showcase the different stitches.


Windy

Deb Caldwell

Windy

"Windy" came about from a UFO (unfinished objects) class at Day Guild. She reminds me of the old 60's Association song about the young woman who trips down the streets of the city smilin' at everybody she sees. The silk fusion background was from another class and had been in my storage for several years. Windy's face was transferred to fabric using Plaid's Picture This. She was created from silk, ribbon, crystals and beads. The companion dragon fly was made to complement Windy's freedom to be her own woman.